Emergency Management

Role of FEMA

Disaster Information for South Dakota

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FEMA Public Assistance Grant Program

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State Role and Resposibility
FEMA Important Numbers
FEMA Presidential Declared Disasters in the U.S. by Calendar Year
FEMA Region VIII Disaster History
FEMA Region VIII

 


 

What is the Public Assistance program?
Once a Presidential disaster is declared, the South Dakota Public Assistance Program is initiated. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) grants money to the state of South Dakota to help rebuild destroyed public related and private non profit facilities to pre-disaster existence.

Why would a Presidential disaster be declared?
A Presidential disaster could be a result of any natural disaster, which includes floods, tornadoes, winter storms, and wildfires.

How is a Presidential disaster declared?
The local jurisdiction would respond to the incident. If the county determines the event to be beyond its capability to manage, the county commission declares a disaster, requesting help from the state. The state assesses the damages and determines whether to request a Presidential Disaster Declaration.

How much damage is required before requesting a Presidential Disaster Declaration?
To qualify for federal assistance, the state must document more than one million dollars of damage to public infrastructure statewide and the county must meet the current FEMA per capita dollar amount of damage.

How much damage is required before requesting financial assistance from the state?
To qualify for state financial assistance, the county must expend two mills of its assessed valuation for emergency or disaster purposes within the twelve months preceding the request under an emergency or disaster declaration by the governor.

What actions should take place during a disaster?

  1. County emergency management personnel notifies the South Dakota Office of Emergency Management (OEM) of the event.
  2. OEM works with county officials to assess the damage and immediate needs of the area.
  3. Following an evaluation, a county determines if the event is beyond its capability to manage. If it is, the county commission declares a disaster, requesting help from the state.
  4. The county identifies and documents any damage to public infrastructure (roads, sewage treatment plants, airports, irrigation channels, schools, public buildings, utilities, and certain essential private non profit facilities). Even though homeowners and business owners are expected to utilize private insurance policies to repair property damage, the county notes the extent of damage to private homes and businesses.
  5. Photographs are taken of the damage.
  6. A detailed record of expenses associated with emergency protective measures and repairs is maintained.
  7. The state assesses the dollar amount of the damages and determines whether to request a Presidential Disaster Declaration.

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